Atherosclerosis is hardening of a blood vessel from a buildup of plaque. Plaque is made of fatty deposits, cholesterol, and calcium. It builds on the inside lining of arteries. This causes the artery to narrow and harden. As plaque builds up, it can slow and even stop blood flow.

Endarterectomy is a surgery to remove this build-up and improve blood flow. Surgery is most often performed on:

  • Carotid arteries in the neck that supply the brain—most common use of endarterectomy
  • The aorta—a major artery that runs from the heart to the abdomen
  • Iliac and femoral arteries of the legs
  • Renal arteries that supply the kidneys with blood

Bilateral Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis
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This surgery is done to remove the build-up of deposits and improve blood flow. After the surgery, the symptoms of reduced blood flow, such as stroke, digestive problems, and leg cramps should improve.